The following is an excerpt.

Guest Lecture: By invitation of SFI CASA, senior manager Alessandro Rossini at PWC gives a guest lecture on NTNU 6. June.

Guest lecturer Alessandro Rossini. The lecture is at the Lecture Room, Department of Structural Engineering NTNU, 6 June at 13:00.

There is a gap between academic research and industrial commercialisation that we often call the technological «valley of death». Simply because so many potentially breakthrough ideas fall in and die here.

  • Why does this happen?
  • How can academia and industry bridge the valley of death and co-create innovation?

By invitation of SFI CASA, senior manager Alessandro Rossini at PWC gives a guest lecture on NTNU 6. June.  He has 14 years of experience in information technology and has worked in academia for nine years and in the industry for five years.

During spring and winter, Rossini has written several chronicles on the topic which is highly relevant for both academia and industry.

«Imagine if the most significant technological inventions in history—such as the steam engine, electricity, or the Internet—had been left stranded in research laboratories and never transferred to society. The world would look radically different today», he states.

Rossini, whose background includes a PhD. in computer science from the University of Bergen, calls this a missed opportunity for economic and social progress.

New technologies evolve through a scale of technology readiness levels (TRL), on their way from research to commercialization. NASA developed a scale that indicates how mature the technology is. The big challenge is, according to Rossini, that academia mainly focuses on TRL 1-4, while the industry prefers to work with TRL 7-9. Therefore, TRL4-6 represents a gap between academic research and the industrial commercialization. In other words: The Technological Valley of Death.

In addition to research and innovation, Rossini´s interests span across cloud services, collaboration platforms, and model-driven software engineering. Alessandro has lived in Norway for 13 years and speaks English, Norwegian, Italian, and Spanish fluently.

The guest lecture is at the Lecture Room, Department of Structural Engineering 6 June at 13:00.