The following is an excerpt.

National Public Radio (NPR) and BBC World Radio recently visited SFI CASA´s Shock Tube Facility.

Associate professor Vegard Aune and PhD candidate Henrik Granum gave the reporters from NPR and BBC a guided tour and demonstration in SIMLab’s shock tube. (Photo: Sølvi W. Normannsen)

The journalists are working on a special report on the Norwegian project Ferry-Free Coastal Highway Route E39. This is called one of the most challenging engineering tasks of our time and gives rise to unique new research. The Norwegian Public Road Administration (NPRA) is responsible for the project, NPRA is also one of CASA´s partners.

Around 50 PhD studies or post-doc projects are in progress. One of those contributing is CASA´s Martin Kristoffersen. He was interviewed on his research on the ability of submerged, floating tunnels to withstand powerful explosions. Kristoffersen defended his PhD thesis at SIMLab in 2014. He was a post doc funded by NPRA for three years and is now a researcher at CASA.

Associate professor Vegard Aune and PhD candidate Henrik Granum gave the reporters from NPR and BBC a guided tour and demonstration in SIMLab’s shock tube. This facility was used by Kristoffersen to make ten tests where unreinforced concrete plates were subjected to varying shock waves:

 

NPRA also published an article about the visit on their homepage.